1. Home
  2. Jobs
  3. Intermediate Care Jobs

Intermediate Care Jobs

Intermediate Care

The care provided at an intermediate facility is designed to provide custodial medical services for those who can't be cared for by their own disabilities or declining health.
Included in this type of setting are acute patients that require stability but lack the ability to return home; they may also need assistance with daily living tasks such as bathing, dressing, etc., which makes these facilities perfect spots within our healthcare system.

Being an intensive care unit (ICU) nurse is an extremely challenging job. ICU nurses are required to have a great deal of education and experience and act as the patient’s advocate when they are unable to communicate their needs or concerns. The ICU nurse must be able to quickly assess each individual case and respond accordingly in order to provide the most optimal care; however, during off-hours, there may not be much for an ICU nurse to do until something changes with the patient. The nurse may take vitals again, or call a physician or another nurse with questions.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is an intermediate care nurse?
The Adult Intermediate Care RN is responsible for managing the care of the adult and elderly patient experiencing severe, but usually non-life threatening problems requiring moderately complex assessment, moderate levels of nursing vigilance, guidance, and attention. The Adult Intermediate Care RN supports the Clinical Manager in providing appropriate care to assigned patients.

As an Adult Intermmediate Care RN, you’ll provide and coordinate complex nursing care for seniors, in a challenging environment. This is about more than just feeding and bathing–this is about supporting life. The Adult Intermediate Care RN is responsible for managing the care of the adult and elderly patient experiencing severe, but usually non-life threatening problems requiring moderately complex assessment, moderate levels of nursing vigilance, guidance, and attention.

What does Intermediate Care Unit mean?
An Intermediate Care Unit is logistically situated between the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and the general ward. It can function as a physically independent unit or as a dedicated section, incorporated within the ICU. It can act as a “step-up” or “step-down” unit between the general ward and the ICU but can also be used to admit patients from the Emergency Department or Recovery ward. Most IMCUs originated from specific medical specialties or were introduced for a specific function (i.e., obstetric care, cardiac care), while later adding function and scope. The characteristics, type, and amount of services provided depend on factors such as resource availability, institutional infrastructure, and the overall health care system.

What is the difference between ICU and intermediate care?
An Intermediate Care Unit is logistically situated between the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and the general ward. It can function as a physically independent unit or as a dedicated section, incorporated within the ICU. It can act as a “step-up” or “step-down” unit between the general ward and the ICU but can also be used to admit patients from the Emergency Department or Recovery ward. Most IMCUs originated from specific medical specialties or were introduced for a specific function (i.e., obstetric care, cardiac care), while later adding function and scope. The characteristics, type, and amount of services provided depend on factors such as resource availability, institutional infrastructure, and the overall health care system.

The main difference between ICU and intermediate care is that patients in an ICU are usually critically ill and require more intensive monitoring and treatment, while patients in an intermediate care unit may be less acutely ill and require less intensive care.

Intermediate care units are often used as a step-down unit from an ICU, meaning that patients who no longer require the level of care provided in an ICU can be transferred to an intermediate care unit for further treatment. Intermediate care units may also be used to provide long-term nursing care for patients who are unable to return home.

Is intermediate care considered critical care?
Yes, intermediate care is considered critical care. Intermediate care facilities provide intense medical monitoring and treatment for patients who are recovering from a serious illness or injury, or who have a chronic medical condition. They offer a bridge between hospital care and home-based care, providing patients with the necessary support and resources to help them recover and return to their everyday lives.

Intermediate care facilities are staffed by nurses, doctors, and other healthcare professionals who are specially trained in critical care medicine. They offer a wide range of services and treatments, including:

• 24-hour nursing care
• Physiotherapy and rehabilitation services
• Dialysis services
• Respiratory therapy services
• IV therapy services
• Nutrition counseling

Intermediate care can provide a more comfortable and less restrictive environment for patients who are recovering from an illness or surgery, as well as those who are transitioning from one level of care to another. Patients in intermediate care typically have nurses on duty 24 hours a day and doctors available on call.

RNs, CNAs, and LPNs connect to local facilities that are ready to fill nursing jobs immediately through the Nursa app.
Nurse Writing on wall

Download the Free App