RN job in Cheyenne, Wyoming | Intensive Care Unit

Type
Travel
License
RN
Specialty
Intensive Care Unit
Start Date
Jul 26th 2021
Job duration
56 weeks / 36 hours
Weeks and Shifts per week
56 Weeks / 3 Shifts per Week
Shift Details
Rotating
Number of weeks and hours per week
56 weeks / 36 hours
Description
Intensive Care / Coronary Nurse (ICU)
Housing Stipend
$672.00
Meal Stipend
$385.00
Facility name
CHEYENNE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
Facility address
214 E 23rd St, Cheyenne, WY, 82001-3748
Facility number of beds
206

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RNs, LPNs, & CNAs Enjoy the Clean Air & Gorgeous Parks

This state is an outdoor lover’s dream and we aren’t kidding about the clean air and gorgeous parks. The city of Cheyenne nestled in the southeast corner of the state is just north of the Rocky Mountains while Casper is firmly settled in the center of the Cowboy state and both these cities rank time and time again on our nation’s list of having the cleanest air.

Wyoming Natural Attractions

As attractive as Wyoming’s biggest natural attractions are, they aren’t the only things to see and enjoy. Rodeo in Wyoming isn’t just an event nor is it only in Cody. Rodeo is an entire season from May to August and towns big and small across the state host rodeos throughout the season.

Wyoming residents enjoy the four seasons to great advantage, even in the cold snowy months, there is plenty to do. Other common weekend activities for the locals include:

  • Horseback Riding
  • Snow Shoeing
  • Snow Mobiling
  • Hiking
  • Stargazing
  • Hot Springs
  • Rock Climbing
  • Biking
  • Camping
  • Dog Sledding
  • Skiing and Snowboarding
  • Ice Sports (fishing, skating, climbing)

Nursa™ Connects Nurses and CNAs to Nearby Per Diem Jobs

Are you a CNA, LPN, or RN living in or near Wyoming? If you’re frustrated with searching for high-paying healthcare jobs, give up the google searches of CNA, LPN, or RN “jobs near me.” Instead, join Nursa™ and discover how easy it can be to find PRN jobs in facilities nearby.

PRN means you’d be working shifts on an as-needed basis. Facilities post their PRN shifts in real time to our Nursa™ job board. No need to go through application processes with each individual facility. Our smartphone application allows you to build and securely send your professional portfolio to facilities that need PRN clinicians. Do it all in one place. Do it all with our support. Do it with Nursa™ today!

Learn What it Takes to Work in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

Nurses who care for the sickest of patients must be highly-skilled and compassionate. An ICU nurse is one who works in the department of a healthcare facility or hospital where the most critical patients go. Patients in the ICU range from those who just came out of surgery to others who have rapidly deteriorating conditions. Patients in the intensive care units are so fragile that they require around-the-clock immediate care and supervision.

nurse working in ICU

The critical care unit (CCU) is another term that is used for ICU. Nurses who work in CCU or ICU must have extensive knowledge of disease processes and highly specialized skills.

Nurses are the most trusted professional for nearly 20 years, and that trust really comes into play as family members and patients rely on ICU nurses to provide interventions and save lives. Do not confuse ICU nurses with emergency nurses who respond to crises and provide emergency care.

Where Do ICU Nurses & CNAs Land High-Paying Jobs?

Larger hospitals. Centralized hospitals. Teaching facilities. Hospitals and healthcare centers that provide intensive care services are always looking for talented nurses and assistants to pick up jobs. ICU nurses and assistants work almost exclusively within their unit during the entire duration of their PRN shift.

Nurses who work in ICU work alongside other trained professionals, such as doctors, therapists, radiologists, etc. There are many divisions of ICU, such as:

  • Neonatal and pediatric ICU nurses work in departments with newborns and children.
  • Psychiatric ICU nurses work in hospitals with psychiatric departments or in psychiatric hospitals with ICUs.
  • Coronary ICU nurses work in hospitals, and particularly, on units that care for people with serious heart defects or diseases.
  • Surgical ICU nurses work with patients who are pre or post-operative and in critical condition.
  • General ICU nurses work in various intensive care units at hospitals and healthcare centers.

What Do ICU Nurses Do?

ICU nurses work in different sub-specialties within this area of nursing, but they are all specially-trained to respond to critically-ill patients. Nurses who work in this setting enjoy low staff-to-patient ratios, which allows them to devote their time exclusively to just one or two patients.

Nurses who work in intensive care units monitor and record the progress of their patients and they respond to their immediate medical needs. ICU nurse job duties may include the following:

  • Recording patient health status
  • Checking patient vital signs
  • Performing or arranging for diagnostic tests
  • Coordinating patient care with other healthcare providers
  • Educating patients and their families
  • Supervising LPNs and other nurses

Recommended Certifications for the ICU Nursing Specialty

To further your education and enhance your professional portfolio on our Nursa™ platform, here is a certification that, if you qualify for, would show potential employers your dedication to the specialty.

  • Certification for Adult Critical Care Nurses (CCRN)

Important Qualities of an ICU Nurse

ICU nurses must possess an impressive set of skills, above and beyond those necessary for all nurses – namely – performing under pressure. Nurses who work in critical care need to excel at communication so that they can facilitate care with patients, family members, and other healthcare professionals.

Good ICU nurses are confident and are able to recognize problems, diagnose them, and execute an action in a timely manner. Creative problem solving and critical thinking are two important leadership skills for ICU nurses.

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